Different Types of Microgreens: Perfect Starter Varieties + Tips

In this article, different types of microgreens will be highlighted. But, don’t let the mentioned crops constrain you. Numerous herbs and vegetables grow well as microgreens. Avoid fruiting vegetables like squash, tomatoes, etc., and lean toward green crops like kale or collards when selecting vegetable kinds.

Below is a chart of the different kinds of microgreens that are covered in this article: (click on the table of contents to skip to that section)

AmaranthCilantro (Coriander)
Arugula(Garden) Cress
BasilEndive
BeetMustard
BroccoliPac Choi
Purple CabbagePea
CeleryRadish
ChardTokyo Bekana
Contents show

You’ll discover that certain vegetables work better than others. Experiment! Microgreens made from herbs are highly intriguing. Everything from chervil to chives can be tested. Herbs can take a while to germinate and reach their full size, but they provide a unique flair.

NOTE: Germination and harvest days statistics are based on growing temperatures between 65 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit.

Use these averages as a starting point and modify them for your particular climate. The obtained weight ranges are based on conventional 20 x 10-inch black plastic trays.

Amaranth

FamilyAmaranthaceae
Genus & speciesAmaranfhus cruentus
Varieties recommendedRed Garnet
TasteSlightly earthy
Average days to germinate2 to 3 days
Average days to harvest (after germination)8 to 12 days
Average weight (per tray)2 to 3 ounces
Difficulty LevelMedium to difficult

History

Amaranth, a native of the Americas, was a dietary mainstay for many of Central and South America’s major civilizations. Planted in the fields alongside maize and beans and was regarded as a “super grain.”

However, the output of amaranth has significantly decreased since it was first cultivated. Though the cause is unknown, hypotheses include the inconvenience of small seeds or agricultural modernization.

According to Aztec mythology, the Spanish conquistadors tried to exterminate amaranth because of its crucial role in ancient Aztec sacrifices, which led to the decrease of the crop.

It is believed that in part because of its beauty, it has succeeded thus far. The entire plant has a distinctive vivid magenta hue uncommon in modern crops.

Despite being primarily unheard of by Americans, amaranth has gained popularity since the 1980s due to its high protein content and numerous health advantages.

Tips for Growing

  • Amaranth needs regularity. Low or sluggish germination and poor growth following germination are both caused by temperature fluctuations. 
  • Typically cultivated as a grain in arid regions since it dislikes persistent soil saturation. 
  • Harvest it when the cotyledons have formed or wait until it has grown true leaves for a different texture. 
  • Avoid growing amaranth during winter because it is a summer crop and enjoys the heat. 
  • This small seed responds well to the towel approach. 
  • Keep the pH of your water below 7.

Tips for Harvesting

  • Harvest just above the soil line. 
  • Due to its extreme lightness, amaranth is typically utilized only to add color to a dish rather than weight.

Washing Advice

Washing amaranth when it is young might be challenging. Because of its lightness and small size, the leaves could slip through your fingers.

To process this crop, use a tiny hand-held strainer. Although, you won’t need a strainer if you give it time to grow.

The tiny beige seed hulls might be challenging to separate from the magenta greens. Any seed hulls on the sides of your washing container can be removed with your hand.

Potential Obstacles

Poor germination, growth, and rot can be caused by overwatering and fluctuating temperatures.
Use this crop with considerable caution.

Amaranth does poorly in acidic soil, and a pH of more than 7 will cause rotting.

Arugula

arugula microgreens
FamilyBrassicaceae
Genus & speciesEruca saliva
Varieties recommendedStandard Arugula, Astro
TasteSharp, peppery, spicy
Average days to germinate2 to 3 days
Average days to harvest (after germination)5 to 7 days
Average weight (per tray)4 to 6 ounces
DifficultyEasy

History

Arugula was once supposed to have aphrodisiac properties, like many other hot, pungent vegetables. Early use was documented as far back as the first century.

Seeds were used to give oils their particular flavor in addition to their spicy leaves. It is known as “rocket” or “roquette” in England and has long been prized for its potent flavor and therapeutic properties.

Arugula has more appeal than just being a primary salad green due to its alleged health benefits, which include the ability to treat freckles and act as a natural deodorant.

Since it started becoming more common in contemporary cuisine in the United States in the early 1990s, it has become more familiar to our sights and palates.

Tips for Growing

  • Quick and straightforward to grow.
  • It can germinate at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or below. 
  • Using a towel can help prevent seeds from adhering to foliage. 
  • Finding true leaves may be challenging if the pH exceeds 7.

Tips for Harvesting

  • Harvesting is typically quick and simple.
  • This crop is vulnerable to rot when there isn’t enough airflow. When harvesting, be careful to avoid any areas that may have rotted.

Washing Advice

  • It might be time-consuming to wash, mainly if it is covered in dirt. 
  • The mucilaginous seed of the arugula causes it to stick to the base of its cotyledons. 
  • Advise using the two-stage washing procedure. 
  • The towel approach also aids in removing seed hulls.

Potential Obstacles 

  • Due to its slender stem, arugula is likelier to tumble and mat when watered. If they fall, gently brush them back up with water. 
  • Washing mucilaginous seeds might take an extended period.

Basil

FamilyLamiaceae
Genus & speciesOcimum basilicum
Varieties recommendedDark Opal, Genovese, Sweet Italian
TastePotent, aromatic basil flavor
Average days to germinate4 to 5 days
Average days to harvest (after germination)14 to 21 days
Average weight (per tray)2 to 4 ounces
DifficultyMedium to difficult

History

In most modern kitchens, basil may be found in some form, whether dried or fresh. It is a versatile herb that has appeared in dishes from Thai to Italian cuisine.

It is a relative of mint and is believed to have originated in Africa and Asia about 5,000 years ago. By the early seventeenth century, it had made its way to the United States.

Due to its strong flavor, basil has been the subject of numerous stories and folktales. There seems to be an odd relationship between basil and scorpions.

Basil was once thought to be able to heal a scorpion sting medically. It was also generally thought that eating basil may induce scorpions to sprout in your brain or that if you left a basil leaf under a plant, it might transform into a scorpion.

While in Mexico, it is believed that basil will prevent a lover’s eyes from wandering, basil is seen as a sign of love in Italy.

The seed and the leaf have both been used medicinally. It has been touted as a remedy for various conditions, from warts to gastrointestinal problems.

Even now, studies on basil’s anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties continue to be conducted. Additionally, it has unique substances called flavonoids that provide a cellular defense.

Tips for Growing

  • It calls for constant warm temperatures. 
  • When the temperature drops at night, germination is aided by using a heating pad.

Tips for Harvesting

  • Basil grows slowly. To preserve the entire plant, cut just above the soil.
  • When harvesting, take your time and use scissors to avoid removing too much soil.

Washing Advice

  • Unless dirty, avoid washing. 
  • The herb is delicate. It will turn black if cleaned and kept in a cold environment. However, a fast rinse won’t affect the leaves if you’re utilizing it right away. 
  • Lay your crop on a cotton cloth to get rid of any dirt gathered throughout the harvesting process. Then, switch the greens from the first fabric to a different one. Your basil will usually stick to the cloth rather than extra dirt. Repeat this procedure numerous times, being careful not to bruise the delicate basil leaves in the process.

Potential Obstacles 

  • Basil needs special care because it is a very sensitive microgreen that bruises readily. 
  • Being a summer crop, it prefers warm conditions and will not withstand significant temperature changes. 
  • Ensure the bags have plenty of air to prevent the basil from bleeding and turning black while being stored.

Beet

FamilyChenopodiaceae
Genus & speciesBeta vulgaris
Varieties recommendedRuby Queen, Detroit Red, Red Ace
TasteEarthy
Average days to germinate4 to 6 days
Average days to harvest (after germination)8 to 12 days
Average weight (per tray)5 to 7 ounces
DifficultyMedium to difficult

History

The Mediterranean region is where the beet was first utilized medicinally, long before written language existed.

In ancient Rome, beets were frequently used to treat fever and constipation. Beets, known in the nineteenth century as the “blood turnip,” were also wild harvested for their leaves.

Anyone who has had modern beets may have noticed their unusual earthy flavor. This is because the soil has unique microbial life that produces an organic substance called geosmin.

Tips for Growing

  • Beet seeds benefit from a 24-hour soaking since it increases germination speed. 
  • It is advantageous to add a teaspoon of liquid kelp to the water. 
  • The first pressing of the soil is frequently avoided for the best results. Instead, spread the seeds, lightly push them into the loose dirt, and then cover them with a cloth or more soil. 
  • To keep this ample seed moist, make sure it is thoroughly covered. 
  • Keep your beet at the same temperature to get excellent germination. 
  • Refrain from keeping the soil overly moist after germination. 
  • Keep the pH below 7.

Tips for Harvesting

  • Wait a few more days before harvesting if most seedlings still have their seed hulls attached to their leaves. 
  • Before harvesting, the remaining big, knobby seeds can be gently plucked out. 
  • You may highlight its colorful stem by cutting the beet near the soil.

Washing Advice

  • The large beet seeds are noticeable in the wash water. When the plant is young, several seed hulls will adhere to the leaves—being careful when harvesting can substantially lessen the time it takes to remove them. 
  • It’s advised to use the two-stage washing process to ensure that all hulls are eliminated.

Potential Obstacles 

  • Beet needs special care; keep an eye on your pH to prevent rot. 
  • Rot will result from overwatering.

Broccoli

FamilyBrassicaceae
Genus & speciesBrassica oleracea
Varieties recommendedStandard Broccoli, DiCicco, Waltham
TasteCabbagelike
Average days to germinate3 to 4 days
Average days to harvest (after germination)5 to 7 days
Average weight (per tray)5 to 7 ounces
DifficultyEasy

History

Wild cabbage, which is native to areas of Europe, is where broccoli got its start. Although it is unknown if the Romans cultivated it, it is evident that Italy was the region where it was first appreciated.

The Italian word meaning “arm” is the source of the term broccoli (braccio). In its early years, people frequently mistook broccoli for its parent plant, cauliflower.

Its history is not particularly well documented due to this ambiguity. Early cultivars of what is now known as sprouting or asparagus broccoli had stalks more akin to broccoli rabe than the compact trees we now recognize.

Related Article: Sprouts vs. Microgreens / Baby Greens (Differences + Nutrition)

It took Italian immigrants until the early nineteenth century to bring it to North America and another century for it to gain widespread acceptance.

Tips for Growing

  • One of the more simple to grow microgreens. 
  • For high yields, seed extensively. 
  • If allowed to reach the actual leaf stage, it may become woody.

Tips for Harvesting

  • Harvesting is quick and simple. 
  • Cut high on the stem to maintain a healthy ratio of leaf to stem.

Washing Advice

  • Fast and straightforward to wash. 
  • Frequently only needs one rinse. 
  • In addition, the rims of the washing tub will naturally attract seed hulls, making disposal simple.

Purple Cabbage

FamilyBrassicaceae
Genus & speciesBrassica o/eracea
Varieties recommendedRed Acre, Red Mammoth, O.P. Red
TasteDistinctive mild cabbage flavor
Average days to germinate3 to 5 days
Average days to harvest (after germination)4 to 7 days
Average weight (per tray)4 to 6 ounces
DifficultyEasy

History

Due to the absence of its distinctive tight head, the cabbage’s wild form resembled contemporary kale. This is how its genealogy is connected to that of the vegetable. Wild cabbage is ancient.

It has been used as food and medicinal for what is thought to be thousands of years. Due to its high vitamin C content, cabbage was employed on ships as a scurvy preventative. Since Roman times, its wide-ranging therapeutic use includes anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory, and hangover cures.

Along with its alleged health benefits, cabbage has long been a popular, low-cost food among early Europeans.

Size, color, and appearance variations exist. However, using natural resources, one can produce a pretty colorfast solution for dark purple by dying purple or red varieties.

Related Article: The health benefits of microgreens

Tips for Growing

  • Some types have a purple tint that is more intense than others. 
  • Deeper purple hues can be produced by extreme cold or heat. 
  • Ages and becomes less purple. 
  • Cabbage tastes sweeter and has a more sensitive texture when it is young.

Tips for Harvesting

  • Simple to harvest.
  • The darker purple tint can make detecting any rot or soil in your harvest more challenging.

Washing Advice

  • The seed hulls of cabbage might be hard to discern because of their dark purple hue. 
  • Again, the dark color of the leaf makes it challenging to distinguish blackened leaves from decay. To save time and your eyes, try the two-stage washing procedure. 
  • A healthy, rot-free tray of cabbage is simple to wash and frequently only needs one or two rinses.

Potential Obstacles 

• The dark color of cabbage can conceal leaf defects. For the home grower, this is unimportant, but it may delay down washing for the seller.

Celery

FamilyApiaceae
Genus & speciesApium graveolens
Varieties recommendedUtah, Standard Cutting Celery
TasteSurprisingly strong celery flavor
Average days to germinate5 to 7 days
Average days to harvest (after germination)14 to 17 days
Average weight per tray2 to 4 ounces
DifficultyEasy to medium

History

An ancient vegetable named celery is believed to have come from the Mediterranean region. It is challenging to be sure because native variants have been discovered from Asia Minor to the southernmost point of South America.

It was discovered in Egyptian tombs, was used medicinally by numerous cultures, and was worn by Greek athletes. In Ayurvedic medicine, celery seed was utilized for anything from arthritis to colds.

Through domestication, the disagreeable bitter taste of wild celery was tamed and gradually began to be valued as a culinary asset. Celery started to appear in English, Italian, and French soups and broths from the beginning of the eighteenth century.

Tips for Growing

  • Celery grows slowly. It may take a while for it to mature and germinate. 
  • It is a crop you will surely want to cultivate to its actual leaf stage because of its tiny cotyledons. 
  • Celery is a sensitive crop that is prone to stunting. It might start to yellow and stop developing when ideal conditions are harmed. 
  • Maintain a constant temperature for celery. 
  • The towel approach works effectively because the seed size is modest. 
  • Keep the pH below 7.

Tips for Harvesting

  • Harvest just above the soil line. 
  • Micros of celery are small and lightweight. 
  • Cut below the cotyledons to ensure you harvest the entire seedling with its actual leaf.

Washing Advice

  • Please put on your glasses for this one because tiny celery micros frequently cling to their seed hulls. 
  • Removing every one of the tiny red celery seed hulls from your wash water can be difficult. It takes time and a sharp eye to grow this crop. 
  • It is advised to use a two-stage washing process with a few additional rinses.

Potential Obstacles 

  • If the pH exceeds 7, growth may be stunted and yellow.

Chard

FamilyChenopodiaceae
Genus & speciesBeta vulgaris
Varieties recommendedRainbow Mix, Ruby Red
TasteSimilar to beet greens, although sweeter
Average days to germinate4 to 6 days
Average days to harvest (after germination)8 to 12 days
Average weight per tray4 to 6 ounces
DifficultyMedium

History

Beet and chard belong to the same species and genus. This is so because they both come from the wild sea beet plant.

Farmers have highlighted particular features of a plant through selective propagation for millennia. For example, chard has been permitted to grow broad leaves that can be eaten raw or cooked rather than emphasizing its root.

Early agriculture was first documented around 350 BC. By 400 BC, the Beta vulgaris species is likely to have been domesticated by the Greeks for their leaves.

It was traded all over the Mediterranean and consumed in various hues and variations. Although the specifics of its therapeutic use are not clearly documented, it is believed that in ancient times, its primary use was for its medicinal benefits.

Tips for Growing

  • Chard seeds benefit from a 24-hour soaking to increase germination rate and speed. 
  • It is advantageous to add a teaspoon of liquid kelp to the water. 
  • The first pressing of the soil is frequently avoided for the best results. Instead, spread the seeds, lightly push them into the loose dirt, and then cover them with a cloth or more soil. 
  • To keep this big seed moist, make sure it is thoroughly covered. 
  • Keep the temperature of your chard constant for excellent germination. 
  • Refrain from keeping the soil overly moist after germination. 
  • Keep the pH below 7.

Tips for Harvesting

  • Wait a few more days before harvesting if most of the seedlings still have their seed hulls attached to their leaves. 
  • Before harvesting, the remaining big, knobby seeds can be gently plucked out. 
  • You may highlight its colorful stem by cutting near the soil.

Washing Advice

  • The large seeds of the chard are visible in the rinse water. Several seed hulls will have adhered to the leaves when the plant is young. Although removing them can take some time, being careful when harvesting can considerably lessen this. 
  • It’s advised to use a two-stage washing process to ensure that all hulls are removed.

Potential Obstacles 

  • Chard needs additional care; keep an eye on your pH to prevent rot. 
  • Rot will result from overwatering.

Cilantro (Coriander)

FamilyApiaceae
Genus & speciesCoriandrum sativum
Varieties recommendedStandard Cilantro, Santo
TasteVery potent flavor and aroma
Average days to germinate5 to 7 days
Average days to harvest (after germination)10 to 14 days
Average weight per tray3 to 5 ounces
DifficultyMedium to difficult

History

Coriander, commonly known as cilantro, is one of the oldest spices in existence. It has been utilized both medicinally and culinarily all across the world since 5000 BC.

Although it has a long history in Asia, it is assumed to be native to Southern Europe. Ancient civilizations in China, India, Egypt, Greece, and Rome employed the plant’s seed and leaves.

This potent herb has been used to lessen flatulence and childbirth pains. In addition, it is regarded as an aphrodisiac in many cultures, and when used in high amounts, it even has narcotic properties.

Additionally, it is particularly good at chelating heavy metals from the body. According to certain documents, cilantro arrived in the colonies of North America around the late seventeenth century.

Tips for Growing

  • The germination rate of cilantro seed marketed with split seed hulls is significantly greater. 
  • The towel approach works well with split seeds. Cover seeds that have not been divided with soil.

Tips for Harvesting

  • Spend some time removing extra seed hulls from the greens before harvesting. You’ll wash faster as a result. 
  • Make sure to give it time to reach the actual leaf stage.

Washing Advice

  • Usually simple to wash and only needs one or two rinses. 
  • Keep an eye out for big seed hulls frequently cling to the greens’ tips. 
  • Don’t let them get too dry. 

Potential Obstacles 

  • It might be challenging to achieve dense germination and high yields when using whole seeds.

(Garden) Cress

FamilyBrassicaceae
Genus & speciesLepidium sativum
Varieties recommendedPresto, Cressida (Curly)
TasteTangy, very spicy
Average days to germinate2 to 3 days
Average days to harvest (after germination)8 to 10 days
Average weight per tray3 to 5 ounces
DifficultyMedium

History

Common watercress, sometimes known as peppercress, and mustard are all relatives of garden cress. Its strong peppery flavor, evident from its name, makes it a popular fresh addition to sandwiches and salads.

The range of languages in which garden cress is described has revealed its evolutionary history.

Records show that the Persians used it first, around 400 BC. There are numerous more medical benefits of peppercress and assisting with parasite and digestive problems.

It has a reputation for both deterring insects and treating insect bites. In addition, it is well recognized as an aphrodisiac and an appetite stimulant due to its stimulating properties.

Other health claims include things like preventing hair loss and leprosy prevention. When served in salads and cooked with bread, cress was revered as a regal food during the Middle Ages.

By the end of the sixteenth century, garden cress had been introduced to North America.

Tips for Growing

  • The seed of cress is mucilaginous. Because of this, the towel approach is beneficial for removing seed hulls and minimizing extra soil during washing. 
  • Lightweight overall; sow thickly for greater yields. 
  • You will pull out a lot of the still-germinating seed if the cloth is removed before the seed has fully germinated. Once the roots have taken, wait another day before taking the towel off.

Tips for Harvesting

  • Be cautious when collecting cress because its stems and cotyledons are brittle. 
  • Keep an eye out for soil clumping at the stem’s base. Simply cut high enough to avoid it when harvesting.

Washing Advice

  • If the towel method is applied, washing only takes one to two rinses. 
  • If soil is utilized to cover the cress seed, dirt and seed hulls will have adhered to the leaves. Even when employing the two-stage washing method, washing is exceedingly time-consuming and necessitates numerous rinses.

Potential Obstacles 

  • If soil is utilized to cover, washing will be slow and difficult. 
  • If it grows past its height, it will begin to rot and turn yellow. 
  • It is prone to over-drying. If using a fan to dry, be careful to fluff often. Gently fluff the greens by flipping them over so that what was on the bottom is now on top and vice versa. 
  • Cress has a limited shelf life as a result of its fragile nature. Store items in airtight bags or containers to slow down the degradation rate.

Endive

FamilyAsteraceae
Genus & speciesCichorium endivia
Varieties recommendedBianca Riccia, Ruffea
TastePleasantly bitter
Average days to germinate3 to 5 days
Average days to harvest (after germination)8 to 12 days
Average weight per tray3 to 5 ounces
DifficultyMedium

History

These bitter, nutritious salad greens go by the names endive, escarole, and chicory. Like many other vegetables, it was initially spotted growing in the wild and was used medicinally.

Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans praised endive for its ability to stimulate the liver. It is also said to be a strong sedative and appetite stimulant. Its unique flavor encouraged its early cultivation, which began in England in the middle of the sixteenth century.

It is unknown when endive cultivation in the country first began. However, there are tales of endive flourishing in American gardens by the early nineteenth century.

Various varieties are cultivated nowadays. Many farmers blanch this plant for a few weeks before harvest. As its heart “whitens,” the texture and flavor become more delicate and less bitter.

Other endive types, including Bianca Riccia, are commonly cultivated as “cut-and-come-again” salad ingredients because of their brilliant yellow, curly leaves, and moderately bitter flavor.

Tips for Growing

  • May develop and germinate under frigid temperatures. 
  • Stunted growth might result from oversowing. 
  • Try to keep it below 7 because it can be sensitive to pH. 

Tips for Harvesting

  • It would be best if you harvested endive close to the earth because it doesn’t grow a long stem like most other seedlings do but instead stays short and broad. 
  • Endive grows so tight to the soil that when it is harvested, it is simple to harvest your greens with a lot of dirt on them. Use a smaller pair of scissors and harvest slowly to prevent this. 

Washing Advice

  • In general, you should take your time with this crop. Getting it clean frequently requires at least two washes. 
  • If mixing, wash the item separately.

Potential Obstacles 

  • Endive leaves can burn in the summer heat if they are exposed to the midday sun. Therefore, avoid watering during the middle of the day and keep your greens out of the sun’s direct rays during peak solar intensity to prevent scorching. 
  • Birds adore this seed. Even in the greenhouse, if endive trays are not covered with lids, songbirds will tear the paper towels and eat every germinating seed. 
  • Your water’s pH impacts endive growth, so keep it under 7.

Mustard

FamilyBrassicaceae
Genus & speciesBrassica juncea
Varieties recommendedRed Giant, Ruby Streaks, Garnet Red
TasteMildly spicy
Average days to germinate3 to 4 days
Average days to harvest (after germination)6 to 10 days
Average weight per trayRed Giant and Garnet Red, 4 to 6 ounces, Ruby Streaks and Crimson Tide, 4 to 8 ounces
DifficultyEasy

History

Mustard has a spicy reputation and has been around for 5,000 years. This one is one of the rare plants that have been grown for both the seed and the leaf.

Greek paste led to the development of mustard as a condiment. The robust flavor of mustard is complemented by its therapeutic properties. It was claimed to work as a poultice for a number of diseases and to lessen the effects of a scorpion’s sting.

From China to the United States, the mustard leaf has been used in cuisine everywhere and is still favored for its flavor and nutritional benefits. Even mustard has a legend of its own.

If sewn into the hem of a German bride’s bridal gown, it was claimed to give her strength in her home and was believed to offer protection from evil spirits.

Tips for Growing

  • Develop true leaves quickly.

Tips for Harvesting

  • It would be best if you cut high on the white stems of the cotyledons to emphasize their hue. 
  • Quick and simple harvesting. 

Washing Advice

  • The many tiny seed hulls of mustard tend to gather around the tub’s edges. 
  • Usually, one wash is adequate. 

Potential Obstacles 

  • If given too much time to grow, mustard cotyledons may turn yellow.

Pac Choi

FamilyBrassicaceae
Genus & speciesBrassica rapa
Varieties recommendedKinkoh (Yellow), Red Choi
TasteSweet full flavor
Average days to germinate3 to 4 days
Average days to harvest (after germination)7 to 10 days
Average weight per tray8 to 10 ounces
DifficultyEasy

History

Bok choy and Chinese cabbage are two common names for pac choi. Chinese chard, Chinese mustard, and celery mustard are other names.

Despite being classified as a member of the same genus, Brassica rapa, it differs significantly from its near relative, napa cabbage. Records show that it has been used in cooking for more than 6,000 years and is a native of China.

While its early cultivation was primarily restricted to Asia, pac choi is consumed and available everywhere today.

Tips for Growing

  • Pac choi is resilient and simple to grow, just like the other Asian greens. 
  • Its crimson hue deepens with increased exposure to direct sunshine (when growing red pac choi). 

Tips for Harvesting

  • Harvest quickly and with a high yield at an inch above the soil.

Washing Advice

  • It’s quick and simple to wash. 
  • The little black seeds are simple to spot and pick out. 
  • Typically, one rinse is adequate.

Pea

FamilyLeguminosae (Fabaceae)
Genus & speciesPisum sativum
Varieties recommendedDwarf Sugar Grey
TasteSweet fresh pea flavor
Average days to germinate3 to 5 days
Average days to harvest (after germination)5 to 7 days
Average weight per tray8 to 12 ounces
DifficultyEasy

History

The history of peas is lengthy and diverse. Despite being such a little vegetable, they have had a significant impact on the world.

According to Norse legend, Thor summoned dragons to load the village wells with peas as a form of retribution. Due to the dragons’ negligence, peas were dumped onto the soil, where they grew and germinated.

The Norse people only raised the peas and consumed them on Thor’s day to respect (and not anger) Thor (Thursday).

Peas found their way into French and British cuisine and were crucial to maintaining American colonial settlers’ nutritional needs.

Between the rich and the destitute, they created a bridge. Peas remain a staple of the American diet, whether fresh, frozen, canned, or both.

Tips for Growing

  • Simple to grow 
  • Ensure to cover seeds with soil so they won’t get exposed after being watered. 
  • A cool-weather crop. Tendrils will be small, delicious, and compact in the spring and fall (3 to 4 inches). 
  • Keep them in the shade if they are growing throughout the summer. Pea shoots may lose their dark color and delicious flavor in the absence of shade. 
  • For animals, sprouted pea seeds are a pleasant treat. Keep them covered and off the ground if you are growing them outside. 

Tips for Harvesting

  • Simple to harvest 
  • Cut high on the stem if it has grown too big. 

Washing Advice

  • It only needs one fast rinse. 
  • The tendency of pea tendrils to reject water makes them dry quickly.

Potential Obstacles

  • A preferred food source for rodents. 
  • Heat in the summer can affect flavor and growth.

Radish

one of the different types of microgreens available: purple radish
FamilyBrassicaceae
Genus & speciesRaphanus sativus
Varieties recommendedHong Vit, China Rose
TastePotent spicy flavor
Average days to germinate3 to 4 days
Average days to harvest (after germination)6 to 8 days
Average weight per tray8 to 10 ounces
DifficultyEasy

History

Radish is so popular today because it is so simple to grow. The radish is simple for beginning gardeners to incorporate into their expanding toolkit because of how quickly it germinates and produces fruit.

The original origin of the radish is unknown, but the Chinese have been cultivating it for thousands of years.

Radishes were a staple in the diet and favorite food of the ancient Egyptians. While we are accustomed to seeing petite red beauties, older European types came in various colors, from white to red, and were known to weigh up to 100 pounds.

By the middle of the seventeenth century, radishes were one of the earliest crops European settlers in North America were known to be cultivating.

Tips for Growing

  • Micro radishes are no different from regular radishes in how rapidly and effortlessly they grow in the garden. 
  • They consistently deliver and don’t need any particular care. 
  • You can cover the huge radish seeds with soil or towels. 

Tips for Harvesting

  • They will stay soft and maintain their bright stem color if picked at the ideal moment. 
  • They will develop woody, tough, and large cotyledons if let to grow past their prime. 
  • Harvest it low on the plant to highlight the stem’s lovely color. 

Washing Advice

  • Usually, washing is simple. 
  • The leaves occasionally have black spots. During the washing process, be on the lookout for this.
  • With this crop, you will have a lot of seed hulls in your wash water. They will float to the top of your tub because they are big and light. Skim the surface with your hand to get rid of them. Until all of the seed hulls have been removed, repeat this process. If you discover that seed hulls are lurking under the leaves, you may find the two-stage cleaning procedure effective.

Potential Obstacles 

  • Hong Vit’s distinctive purple stem might lose its rich hue if planted in the shade. The best stem color will be achieved in full sun. Radish will benefit from exposure to lower temperatures in this regard. 
  • The quality of China rose seeds might vary substantially. Unfortunately, some seeds don’t seem to be able to produce lovely pink stems, even though full sun and cold stress will aid with color. 
  • On its cotyledons, China Rose seed of lower grade will have a lot of black dots.

Tokyo Bekana

FamilyBrassicaceae
Genus & speciesBrassica rapa (chinensis group)
Varieties recommendedTokyo Bekana
TasteSweet lettuce flavor
Average days to germinate3 to 4 days
Average days to harvest (after germination)7 to 10 days
Average weight per tray8 to 10 ounces
DifficultyEasy

History

Pac choi and Tokyo Bekana have very similar pasts. Both types are believed to have originated in Asia and domesticated for over 6,000 years.

The Japanese have developed and modified a Chinese cabbage known as Tokyo Bekana. It resembles a napa cabbage in appearance but differs from it in texture and has light yellow leaves.

It’s possible that the unique cultivation of Tokyo Bekana, also known as pei tsai, started after soldiers from the Russo-Japanese War transported the parent plant, Brassica rapa, from China back to Japan.

Tips for Growing

  • A tough Asian green, Tokyo Bekana. 
  • It develops an attractive genuine leaf in addition to being lovely when it is in the cotyledon stage. 
  • Swiftly puts on true leaves. 

Tips for Harvesting

  • Cut crops an inch above the ground. 
  • Produces large yields and harvests quickly. 

Washing Advice

  • This crop makes washing simple, and a single rinse generally suffices. 
  • Its little, dark seed hulls stand out against the cotyledons’ bright yellow color, making them simple to spot and separate. 

Potential Obstacles 

  • Tokyo’s bright yellow changes to a mild green color in the summer. 
  • Uneven growth is possible.

Final Thoughts: Different Types of Microgreens

Well, there you have it. This is a perfect foundation for different types of microgreens to build from. And as mentioned, don’t be afraid to experiment with other varieties. Microgreens are the same as regular plants, just planted and harvested earlier.

Interested? Here is an article that explains the essential supplies needed to grow microgreens.